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STATEMENT OF APA PRESIDENT IN RESPONSE TO FLORIDA HIGH SCHOOL SHOOTING

Following is the statement of APA President Jessica Henderson Daniel, Ph.D., on the shooting at a Florida high school that killed 17 and injured at least 14 others:

“Tragically, our nation is once again confronted with a school shooting, which has cut short all too many lives and forever affected so many others. We must take concerted action as a nation to ensure that our schools are once again safe havens for our children and youth. In this time of shock and grief, psychology and psychologists can offer those in distress the comfort, guidance and counseling they need to maintain resilience in the midst of such profound sorrow.”  Continue reading.


NEW YORK FIRST STATE TO REQUIRE MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS

When it comes to mental health, there’s still far too much miseducation and stigma around the issue – and those invisible barriers continue to create very real challenges for people when it comes to getting help. Fortunately, one state is enlightening its citizens by starting with kids. Beginning July 1, New York will become the first state to require mental health education be taught in all its schools.

Starting next September, the health curriculum for elementary, middle and high school students in New York will need to include a mental health component. According to Albany’s Times Union, local districts will be in charge of creating their own curriculum, but will receive oversight from the Mental Health Association of New York State, in conjunction with the New York State Department of Education. Continue reading.


APA SURVEY: MAJORITY OF AMERICANS STRESSED BY COST OF HEALTH INSURANCE

Two-thirds of U.S. adults (66 percent) cite the cost of health insurance as a stressor for themselves, their loved ones or in general, when asked about specific health issues that cause them stress. This stress about the cost of health insurance seems to affect Americans at all income levels.

In addition, more than six in 10 adults (63 percent) cite uncertainty about the future, both with their own health and that of others, as a source of stress. Insurance costs and looming uncertainty about the future are just two of the numerous causes of stress surrounding health, according to the American Psychological Association’s report, “Stress in America™: Uncertainty About Health Care,” released on January 24 and based on data from the annual Stress in America™ survey, conducted online by The Harris Poll. Continue reading.


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