2018 NCPA Spring Conference

North Carolina Psychological Association
2018 Spring CE Workshops & Conference

April 27 & 28, 2018
The Friday Center – Chapel Hill, NC

Register Online


Friday


FRIDAY, APRIL 27: MORNING SESSION: 9:00 AM – 12:15 AM

Time: 9:00 am – 12:15 am
Credit: 3 hours Category “A” Continuing Education Credit
Attendance: To receive credit, you must be present for the entire workshop, and you must sign the sign-in/sign-out sheets. No partial credit will be given.

Morning Workshop 1: Practicing Cultural Humility: Ethical and Clinical Considerations*
Tonya D. Armstrong, Ph.D., M.T.S., Owner of The Armstrong Center for Hope
*This workshop is intended to meet the NC Psychology Board’s Ethics/Legal requirements for psychologists.

Due to the rapidly shifting demographics of our world and our local communities, psychologists
are increasingly rising to the ethical challenges of enhancing their cultural humility across multiple spheres of human functioning. In today’s clinical practice, we must broaden our ethical practices to include not only respect, but also deeper understanding and connection; not only for adults, but also for children and adolescents; not only by ethnicity, but also by socioeconomic class, gender, faith, sexuality, and other categories of difference. This educational program will provide specific guidance in the practical application of the values, principles, and standards of the “Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct”. Ultimately, we are striving for not only the absence of mental illness, but also the flourishing of mental health and wellness.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. identify at least 4 traditional barriers to cultural humility in clinical practice;
2. assess at least 4 aspects of their own cultural narratives that may come into conflict with client narratives; and
3. discuss 3 steps that can further enhance the practice of cultural humility.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Didactic Material, Video, Experiential Exercises, Group Discussion

Tonya D. Armstrong, Ph.D., M.T.S., is a licensed psychologist and founder of The Armstrong Center for Hope (www.armstrongcfh.com), an interdisciplinary group practice in Durham, NC, providing psychological and spiritual wellness for all ages. She holds a double major in psychology and music from Yale University, a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Master of Arts in Theological Studies (magna cum laude) from Duke University Divinity School. Dr. Armstrong also holds a Master of Theological Studies degree from Duke Divinity School and maintains a commitment to ministry in settings across the community. A member of NCPA since 1995, Dr. Armstrong has been a member of the Insurance Committee since 2011. She is the President- Elect of the North Carolina Psychological Association and the author and producer of Blossoming Hope: The Black Christian Woman’s Guide to Mental Health and Wellness and Blossoming Hope: Soothing Songs and Spoken Word Recordings. In her leisure time, she enjoys laughing, harmonizing, and traveling with her husband of 25 years and their two children.

 

Morning Workshop 2: Longitudinal Outcome of First-Year College Students With and Without ADHD
Arthur D. Anastopoulos, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

What happens to emerging adults with ADHD when they go to college? This presentation will describe the many educational, psychological, and social challenges faced by college students with ADHD and provide a conceptual framework for understanding why such challenges arise. This presentation will also discuss cutting-edge findings from the recently completed NIMH- funded TRAC (Trajectories Related to ADHD in College) will be addressed. Practical suggestions for the clinical assessment and treatment of college students, both in on-campus and in off-campus settings, will be discussed.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. explain why having ADHD places emerging adults at risk during college;
2. list at least three ways in which ADHD impairs educational, psychological, and social functioning;
3. describe the developmental trajectories of ADHD and its associated features and impairments across the first four years of college; and
4. recognize at least three ways in which the assessment and treatment of college students with ADHD differs from that of children and adults.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture & Discussion

Dr. Arthur D. Anastopoulos received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University. After graduating, he took a Staff Psychologist position in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Thereafter he held a joint appointment in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, where he also served as Chief of the ADHD Clinic founded by Dr. Russell A. Barkley. For the past 21 years, Dr. Anastopoulos has been on the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, first as a member of the Department of Psychology and more recently as a Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies. In addition to creating and directing an ADHD Clinic, Dr. Anastopoulos has been an investigator on numerous research grants. His focus has primarily been on two ongoing projects. First, as the lead Principal Investigator on a 5-year, multi-site NIH-funded project entitled, “Longitudinal Outcome of College Students with ADHD”; the second, a 4-year IES funded multi-site project called, “Improving the Educational and Social-Emotional Functioning of College Students with ADHD”, for which he also serves as the lead Principal Investigator. Dr. Anastopoulos regularly presents his findings at national and international scientific meetings. He has authored three books and more than 80 articles and book chapters on the topic of ADHD. Dr. Anastopoulos has also given more than 250 invited ADHD presentations to various parent groups and educators, as well as medical and mental health professionals.

 


FRIDAY, APRIL 27: AFTERNOON SESSION: 1:30 PM – 4:45 PM

Time: 1:30 PM – 4:45 PM
Credit: 3 hours Category “A” Continuing Education Credit
Attendance: To receive credit, you must be present for the entire workshop, and you must sign the sign-in/sign-out sheets. No partial credit will be given.

Workshop 1: ACCESS: A New CBT Program for College Students with ADHD
Arthur D. Anastopoulos, Ph.D., Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

A limited but increasing number of studies have recently examined the impact of cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT) and other psychosocial treatments for college students with ADHD (see He & Antshel, 2016 for a review). This presentation will initially describe and compare these different intervention approaches, followed by a discussion of reported treatment gains across studies. Against this background, there will be a detailed discussion of the cognitive- behavioral treatment program known as ACCESS – Accessing Campus Connections and Empowering Student Success – which was initially developed and refined as part of the UNC System College STAR Project and currently is being examined in an ongoing 4-year IES-funded efficacy trial. The manner in which the group CBT and mentoring components of ACCESS are delivered clinically during its active and maintenance phases will be discussed in detail, along with the challenges that clinicians may face when treating this population. Preliminary findings from the ongoing efficacy trial will be also be presented.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. list at least three ways in which existing CBT interventions for college students with ADHD differ;
2. identify the hypothesized mechanisms of clinical change within the ACCESS program;
3. describe three improvements in functioning following implementation of ACCESS; and
4. discuss two common challenges faced by clinicians when treating college students with ADHD.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture & Discussion

Dr. Arthur D. Anastopoulos received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Purdue University. After graduating, he took a Staff Psychologist position in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Thereafter he held a joint appointment in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, where he also served as Chief of the ADHD Clinic founded by Dr. Russell A. Barkley. For the past 21 years, Dr. Anastopoulos has been on the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, first as a member of the Department of Psychology and more recently as a Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies. In addition to creating and directing an ADHD Clinic, Dr. Anastopoulos has been an investigator on numerous research grants. His focus has primarily been on two ongoing projects. First, as the lead Principal Investigator on a 5-year, multi-site NIH-funded project entitled, “Longitudinal Outcome of College Students with ADHD”; the second, a 4-year IES funded multi-site project called, “Improving the Educational and Social-Emotional Functioning of College Students with ADHD”, for which he also serves as the lead Principal Investigator. Dr. Anastopoulos regularly presents his findings at national and international scientific meetings. He has authored three books and more than 80 articles and book chapters on the topic of ADHD. Dr. Anastopoulos has also given more than 250 invited ADHD presentations to various parent groups and educators, as well as medical and mental health professionals.

 

Workshop 2: Young, Talented, and Motivated: Understanding the Ways in which Dialect Variation, Motivation, and Unrecognized Talent Influence Academic Outcomes in African-American Youth
Martin P. Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Program of Education, Duke University
Makeba Parramore Wilbourn, Ph.D., Associate Professor Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Duke University

Having worked extensively with African-American youth, two scholars will present research and offer best practices for participants who are eager to improve the educational outcomes for at-risk, African-American students. The scholars will present research describing the ways in which particular factors both directly and indirectly influence African-American students’ educational experiences. Participants will be provided with detailed descriptions of how dialect variation, language-disorder risk, and unrecognized talent/skill impact African-American students’ academic motivation and achievement. This presentation will also provide participants with best practice ways to (1) identify these factors and to (2) utilize culturally sensitive assessment tools.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. articulate how culturally-sensitive assessments of dialect variation and language-disorder risk in African-American children can be used to improve academic outcomes;
2. identify 4 factors that influence African-American children’s intrinsic motivation and academic outcomes; and
3. name 3 ways to identify unrecognized talent/skill sets in African-American male youth.

Instructional Level: Basic
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Interactive

Martin P. Smith is an Assistant Professor of Education at the Program of Education at Duke University. After matriculating at University of California at Berkeley, where he earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education while playing on the basketball team, Dr. Smith was able to fuse his passion for education and sport. Dr. Smith completed his Cultural Studies in Education Ph.D. at The University of Texas at Austin 2015. Thereafter he conducted post- doctoral research in Spanish at UT’s Mesoamerica Center in Antigua, Guatemala, studying the amalgamation of race, culture, education, and athletics, which he continues to research. His work has been published in the Journal of Urban Education and The Journal of Race, Gender and Class.

Makeba Parramore Wilbourn, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of the Practice in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. Dr. Wilbourn joined the Duke faculty in 2008 after receiving her doctorate in developmental psychology from Cornell University. Wilbourn’s research examines how culturally-specific factors (e.g., ethnicity/race, dialect variation, poverty) influence children’s language skills, reading development, and achievement in the United States. She is the recipient of the 2017 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).


Saturday


SATURDAY, APRIL 28: MORNING WORKSHOPS: 8:30 AM -11:45 AM

Time: 8:30 am – 11:45 am
Credit: 3 hours Category “A” Continuing Education Credit
Attendance: To receive credit, you must be present for the entire workshop, and you must sign the sign-in/sign-out sheets. No partial credit will be given.

Morning Workshop 1: Personality Adaptations: A New Guide to Human Understanding in Psychotherapy and Counseling
Vann S. Joines, Ph.D., President, Southeast Institute for Group and Family Therapy, Chapel Hill, NC

This workshop will present a new approach to working with personality issues. Six core adaptations will be presented which are believed to represent the basic building blocks of personality. Three are considered “surviving adaptations” and three are considered “performing adaptations”. All of us learn the adaptations that work best in our family of origin. Each adaptation has an “Open Door”, in terms of feeling, thinking, or behavior, where it is easiest to make contact and establish rapport, a “Target Door”, where interventions will have the most effect, and a “Trap Door”, where the individual’s defenses are the greatest. By knowing these doors, a therapist, regardless of the therapeutic model being used, can quickly establish rapport, target interventions to the place where they will be the most effective, and avoid becoming trapped in the client’s defenses.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. list the six core personality adaptations;
2. describe how these adaptations develop;
3. state the Open, Target, and Trap Doors for each adaptation;
4. list the primary driver behavior for each adaptation;
5. describe the difference between a “surviving” and a “performing” adaptation; and
6. give at least three positive and three negative behaviors for each adaptation.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture with PowerPoint, Discussion

Vann S. Joines, Ph.D. is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in NC and President and Director of the Southeast Institute for Group and Family Therapy in Chapel Hill. He is an international trainer, supervisor, and consultant, having trained therapists in over 30 countries with training programs in China, Japan, and the US. He is a Certified Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst, a Diplomate and Founding Member of the Re-decision Therapy Association, a Clinical Member, and Approved Supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, a Certified Group Psychotherapist and a Life Fellow of the American Group Psychotherapy Association. Dr. Joines is Co-Author of TA Today: A New Introduction to Transactional Analysis (Lifespace Publishing, 1987, 2012) and Personality Adaptations: A New Guide to Human Understanding in Psychotherapy and Counseling (Lifespace Publishing, 2002). He is also Author of the Joines Personality Adaptation Questionnaire and the JPAQ Administration, Scoring and Interpretative Kit (Southeast Institute, 2002).

 

Morning Workshop 2: Modern Gender Identity Development: Childhood Through Adolescence
Dane R. Whicker, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center
Kristen Russell, LCSW, Duke University Medical Center

As adults, it is likely difficult for us to recall the process by which we came to realize our own gender identities. For some individuals, this process may have been a straightforward, linear one. For others, the process of developing one’s gender identity may have been a long and winding road. Most young children follow a predictable pattern of gender identity development; however, there are some differences found among special groups of individuals. Generally, in later childhood and adolescence, we are seeing significant changes in younger cohorts regarding awareness and assumption of diverse gender identities, as well as in the acceptance of fluidity in gender identification. This can often be confusing for clinicians, parents, and clients. Using a combination of lecture and group discussion, issues with modern gender identity development will be explored in an affirming way. Topics will be guided by current empirically supported literature and informed by workshop leaders’ personal clinical experiences working in a gender care specialty clinic.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. describe three aspects of typical gender identity development patterns, including at least three developmental milestones and the ages by which most children reach them;
2. identify and describe two unique gender identity development patterns (e.g., children with early-onset gender dysphoria) and how each appears in clinical settings;
3. state at least two up-to-date terms for gender identities beyond “male” and “female” and how to discuss these in an affirming way with young clients and/or parents; and
4. name and access at least two appropriate clinical tools for describing the concept of gender identity to clients across the age span including children, adolescents, and adults.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture with Video, Case Examples, Discussion

Dane Whicker is a clinical psychologist and clinical associate within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Whicker serves on the Duke School of Medicine Diversity and Inclusion Council and the Sexual and Gender Diversity Advisory Council. He works as part of the Duke Child and Adolescent Gender Care Clinic Team with transgender youth who are undergoing medical transition, and also collaborates with the Duke Medical Home in Family Medicine for care with transgender adults. Dr. Whicker has been actively involved in training and education efforts on providing LGBTQ-affirmative clinical care to medical and mental health providers within and outside the Duke community. Dr. Whicker’s other clinical efforts and primary theoretical training background is in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. Informed by this model, he has developed family skills training programming to support family members of transgender children. His research background has focused on gender, sexual orientation, and eating disorders in transgender youth.

Kristen Russell is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker at Duke University Medical Center. She has specialized in providing outpatient child and adolescent gender care services in Duke Children’s Hospital’s Endocrinology Department and in the Duke Children’s Evaluation Center. Ms. Russell has been working as part of the Duke Child and Adolescent Gender Care Clinic Team since its inception and continues to lead clinic growth efforts, working side-by-side with pediatric endocrinologists. Ms. Russell has been trained by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health and is a current member. Ms. Russell has been an invited lecturer for Duke School of Medicine’s diversity training program for medical school residents, and is actively involved in training other medical providers across departments at Duke University Medical Center. Additionally, Ms. Russell has led intensive school trainings in local area schools focusing on training teachers and administrators on how to provide inclusive environments for transgender students throughout the age span.

 

Morning Workshop 3: Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP): Creating Intense and Curative Relationships 
Holly Yates, MS, LPC, Certified Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) Trainer

Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a therapeutic model that emphasizes the therapist- client relationship as the main agent for change and healing. FAP has its roots in Radical Behaviorism while at its heart it is an interpersonal therapy. FAP utilizes behavioral principles to help clients broaden repertoires and shape more effective and workable behaviors through 5 FAP rules. FAP at its core focuses on Clinically Relevant Behavior (CRB). CRBs are behaviors that show up in session that are functionally relevant to the client’s daily life. When therapists can identify and discriminate CRB, through behavioral principles, identified here as Awareness Courage and Love, they can help shape client behavior that can significantly impact client’s quality of life. There is empirical evidence to support it’s efficacy primarily based on decades of case study and laboratory experimentation. Current research includes qualitative studies, controlled and uncontrolled single-case designs, group designs and studies on training therapists in FAP. Discussions on the use of FAP as both a stand-alone as well as enhanced therapy will take place in this workshop.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. list and describe the 5 Rules of FAP;
2. identify and discriminate at least three types of Clinically Relevant Behaviors (CRBs) through examining examples of therapist-client interactions and experiential exercises;
3. define the three FAP concepts namely, Awareness, Courage, and Love, in Behavioral terms and demonstrate how they correspond to the 5 FAP Rules; and
4. formulate at least two practice case conceptualizations within the FAP model, including identifying at least two Clinically Relevant Behaviors (CRBs) as they occur in session.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: PowerPoint, Experiential Exercises, Audio Session

Holly Yates has been in private practice in North Carolina since 2004. Her specialty areas are working with adults individually and in couples and groups who are addressing depression, anxiety, mood disorders, and life stressors through clinical intervention and skills training. Holly’s practice centers on Third Wave therapies, specifically Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). She is a founding facilitator of the online ACT Peer Intervision Network sponsored through ACBS and a Certified FAP Trainer through University of Washington. Holly received supervision from Mavis Tsai, Ph.D. and Robert Kohlenberg, Ph.D. (developers of FAP), and Gareth Holman, Ph.D., in attaining her FAP certification, and remains under their mentorship. She is currently under the mentorship of Matthieu Villatte, Ph.D., as she moves toward becoming an ACT Peer Review Trainer. Holly has presented FAP and ACT most recently at the MAC ACBS Conference October 2017 in Washington DC, at ACBS World-Con 2016 in Seattle, WA and ACBS World- Con 2017 in Seville, Spain. She trained in DBT and started the DBT program at Triumph LLC. Holly is Co-founder of North Wake Counseling Partners in Raleigh, NC.


9:30 am – 12:00 pm ANNUAL NCPF POSTER SESSION
Graduate & Undergraduate Psychology Students will present their posters.
Recognition of Poster Session entries will be acknowledged at the membership luncheon. The Poster Session is organized by the NC Psychological Foundation’s Scientific, Academic, & Student Affairs Committee, co-chaired by NCPA Members John Parsley, Psy.D. & Terra Rose, Psy.D., and NCPA Office Manager Carol Kulwicki.

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm: NCPA 70th ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON – TRILLIUM A
The business meeting portion of lunch will include an annual report from Susan McCammon, Ph.D., NCPA President. This includes a financial update and other matters of the Association. In addition, the Poster Session particpants will be recognized, the NCPA and NCPF President’s Awards, the Mary G. Clarke Award, and The Sally Cameron Award will be presented.
This is an extra special year for NCPA, as we are celebrating our 70th Anniversary!


AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS: 1:45 PM – 5:00 PM

Time: 1:45 pm – 5:00 pm
Credit: 3 hours Category “A” Continuing Education Credit
Attendance: To receive credit, you must be present for the entire workshop, and you must sign the sign-in/sign-out sheets. No partial credit will be given.

Afternoon Workshop 1: Re-decision Therapy: Working with the Emotional Part of the Brain
Vann S. Joines, Ph.D., President, Southeast Institute for Group and Family Therapy, Chapel Hill, NC

Robert Goulding, MD and Mary Goulding, MSW developed Re-decision Therapy as a brief, in- depth, effective, experiential treatment modality to assist clients in reclaiming the power and autonomy they had to give up in order to survive in childhood. Modern Neuroscience has identified that it is working with the emotional brain that produces lasting change in psychotherapy and re-decision therapy offers a powerful and direct way of doing that. This workshop will present a brief overview of the theory and types of work done in re-decision therapy and a demonstration group to illustrate and provide an experience of the process. The overall goal is the achievement of awareness, spontaneity, and the capacity of intimacy with others.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. demonstrate how to get a therapeutic contract with a client;
2. describe the four main types of work done in re-decision therapy; 3. list the seven major components of re-decision therapy; and
4. describe the fourteen steps in the re-decision process.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture, Demonstration, Discussion

Vann S. Joines, Ph.D. is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in NC and President and Director of the Southeast Institute for Group and Family Therapy in Chapel Hill. He is an international trainer, supervisor, and consultant, having trained therapists in over 30 countries with training programs in China, Japan, and the US. He is a Certified Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst, a Diplomate and Founding Member of the Re-decision Therapy Association, a Clinical Member, and Approved Supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, a Certified Group Psychotherapist and a Life Fellow of the American Group Psychotherapy Association. Dr. Joines is Co-Author of TA Today: A New Introduction to Transactional Analysis (Lifespace Publishing, 1987, 2012) and Personality Adaptations: A New Guide to Human Understanding in Psychotherapy and Counseling (Lifespace Publishing, 2002). He is also Author of the Joines Personality Adaptation Questionnaire and the JPAQ Administration, Scoring and Interpretative Kit (Southeast Institute, 2002).

 

Afternoon Workshop 2: Children and Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria:
Assessment and Treatment Considerations for Young Clients and their Families

Dane R. Whicker, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center
Kristen Russell, LCSW, Duke University Medical Center

As more and more parents are seeking services for their children and adolescents who are exhibiting symptoms gender dysphoria, clinicians need the tools to assess and treat this complicated problem. Gender dysphoria often presents with other co-morbid issues, many of which are severe and life-threatening (e.g., self-harm, suicidal ideation), particularly if the client is at the beginning stages of puberty. There is a limited time window in which medical interventions (i.e., puberty blockers) are effective for these young patients. It is important for a clinician to be prepared to assess the client’s needs, discuss the findings with the client and their parents, explain options for treatment, and make the appropriate referrals in a timely manner. Using a combination of lecture, case examples, and group discussion, participants will learn about conducting assessments for transgender youth and gain important knowledge about medical treatment options for reducing gender dysphoria for transgender youth.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. define persistence and desistence of gender dysphoria in transgender youth based on the current literature;
2. name two markers of the specific developmental window during which puberty blockers may be effective for transgender youth;
3. state six common questions and concerns that arise from parents and some effective ways to answer them; and
4. name at least two options for treatment of gender dysphoria and be able to name at least 3 risks and 3 benefits for each option.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture w/ Video, Case Examples, Discussion & Small Group Exercises

Dane Whicker is a clinical psychologist and clinical associate within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Whicker serves on the Duke School of Medicine Diversity and Inclusion Council and the Sexual and Gender Diversity Advisory Council. He works as part of the Duke Child and Adolescent Gender Care Clinic Team with transgender youth who are undergoing medical transition, and also collaborates with the Duke Medical Home in Family Medicine for care with transgender adults. Dr. Whicker has been actively involved in training and education efforts on providing LGBTQ-affirmative clinical care to medical and mental health providers within and outside the Duke community. Dr. Whicker’s other clinical efforts and primary theoretical training background is in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. Informed by this model, he has developed family skills training programming to support family members of transgender children. His research background has focused on gender, sexual orientation, and eating disorders in transgender youth.

Kristen Russell is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker at Duke University Medical Center. She has specialized in providing outpatient child and adolescent gender care services in Duke Children’s Hospital’s Endocrinology Department and in the Duke Children’s Evaluation Center. Ms. Russell has been working as part of the Duke Child and Adolescent Gender Care Clinic Team since its inception and continues to lead clinic growth efforts, working side-by-side with pediatric endocrinologists. Ms. Russell has been trained by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health and is a current member. Ms. Russell has been an invited lecturer for Duke School of Medicine’s diversity training program for medical school residents, and is actively involved in training other medical providers across departments at Duke University Medical Center. Additionally, Ms. Russell has led intensive school trainings in local area schools focusing on training teachers and administrators on how to provide inclusive environments for transgender students throughout the age span.

 

Afternoon Workshop 3: Resolving Complex Ethical Dilemmas in Psychological Practice*
Erica H. Wise, Ph.D., Clinical Professor and Director of the Psychology Training Clinic University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
*This workshop is intended to meet the NC Psychology Board’s Ethics/Legal requirements for psychologists.

In the practice of psychology, we frequently encounter complex dilemmas that have clinical, ethical, and legal elements. The focus of this workshop will be on clinical practice vignettes that will allow participants to actively discuss, analyze and resolve these types of situations. A model of ethical decision-making will be presented that incorporates emotional, interpersonal and contextual factors.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. describe the philosophical underpinnings of ethics codes and identify applicable sources of guidance for the ethical and legal practice of psychology;
2. describe and apply a model of ethical decision making to practice vignettes; and
3. state common considerations in ethical decision making including the identification of competing obligations and the application of judgment rules vs. absolute ethical or legal duties.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture, Small and Large Group Discussion

Erica H. Wise, Ph.D. is Clinical Professor and Director of the Psychology Training Clinic for the Department of Psychology at UNC Chapel Hill. She teaches doctoral level courses that focus on clinical theory and practice, ethics and diversity. She is a former chair of the APA Ethics Committee and a current member of the APA Board of Educational Affairs. She is past president of NCPA and is co-chair of the NCPA Professional Affairs and Ethics Committee. She is the recipient of the Fifth Annual APA Ethics Committee Award for Outstanding Contributions to Ethics Education and she is a frequent presenter and consultant on ethical issues in clinical psychology. Her professional interests include doctoral education and training, continuing education for psychologists and applications of ethics and self-care in academic and professional practice settings. She strives to incorporate high standards of professional practice into all of her endeavors.

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