2017 NCPF/NCPA Fall CE Workshops

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6 & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7
THE FRIDAY CENTER – CHAPEL HILL, NC

Friday, October 6
Morning – 9:00 am – 12:15 pm

  • Reporting Child Abuse & Working w Child Welfare Clients*
  • Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Characteristics & Course

Afternoon – 1:15 pm – 4:30 pm

  • Dilemmas Working w High Conflict Families*
  • Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Assessment & Treatment

Saturday, October 7
Morning – 9:00 am – 12:15 pm

  • ACT: Facilitating Meaningful Behavior Change
  • Mind Your Own Business: Managing the Business Side of Your Private Practice**

Afternoon – 1:15 pm – 4:30 pm

  • Using ACT to Treat AN or AN-Spectrum Behavior
  • A Conversation About Tricky Ethical & Legal Issues Encountered in Clinical Practice*

*WORKSHOPS WITH AN ASTERISK (*) ARE INTENDED TO MEET THE ETHICAL/LEGAL CE REQUIREMENTS FOR NC PSYCHOLOGISTS
**THE WORKSHOP WITH TWO ASTERISKS (**) IS NOT OFFERED FOR CE CREDIT.
The North Carolina Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer Category ‘A’ Continuing Education credit for psychologists.


Register Online!


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6
MORNING WORKSHOPS: 9:00 AM -12:15 PM

Reporting Child Abuse and Working with Child Welfare Involved Clients*
Warren Ludwig, Ph.D., Child Welfare and Mental Health Consultant

This workshop will present information on when psychologists in clinical practice are required by law to make reports of child abuse and neglect, how reports should be made, and what to expect afterwards from Child Protective Services (CPS), and considerations on communicating with clients. The second focus of the workshop will be to present basic considerations related to providing therapy and evaluation services to members of families who are involved with CPS and foster care. The workshop will focus on legal and ethical issues related to sharing information with Child Protective Services, working with Child Welfare involved clients, and responding to related requests for records or testimony from the court system. It is intended for clinicians who want to know their legal obligations when they hear or see something that causes them to suspect a child is being abused or neglected, want to work effectively with children or adults who become involved with the Child Welfare system, and/or want to learn about specialty roles working with children and families in which child maltreatment has occurred.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. identify two critical questions to answer to determine if a CPS report is required, and two issues that are not relevant to the legal obligation to make a report;
2. identify 3 important issues for communication with clients about CPS reports;
3. describe 3 issues that should be clarified when providing evaluation or therapy for clients involved with CPS or foster care; and
4. name 4 important things to consider when responding to subpoenas and requests for court testimony in Child Protective Services cases.

Instructional Level: Basic
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, PowerPoint

Dr. Ludwig worked for 30 years in North Carolina’s public mental health and child welfare systems. He began as clinical administrator at Lee-Harnett MH/DD/SAS, where he was director of child mental health services and worked closely with child welfare programs in both Lee and Harnett Counties. He came to Wake County MH/DD/SAS as Clinical Director of Adult Mental Health in 1988, and later was Director of Child Mental Health. After Wake County became a consolidated human services agency, he administered various programs for children and was the child welfare director for 13 years before leaving the county in 2014. He currently is a Child Welfare and Mental Health consultant and a fellow at UNC-CH School of Social Work. He is a long-time member of NCPA with a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Harvard, a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Rochester, and a psychology license from the North Carolina Psychology Board.

 

Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Characteristics and Course
Anna Van Meter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University

This workshop will provide attendees with a comprehensive overview of bipolar disorder, covering topics including: risk factors for the illness, early signs of mood episodes, comorbid disorders, cognitive and social impact of the illness, quality of life issues, and expected illness trajectory. Although the emphasis will be on cases of bipolar disorder that present before adulthood, bipolar disorder is – for most – a life-long illness; consequently, this workshop will also touch on important issues for adults with bipolar disorder.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. describe the primary factors that put young people at risk for bipolar disorder;
2. list symptoms experienced by a majority of people prior to the onset of an initial mood episode;
3. explain which cognitive domains are most likely to be affected in people with bipolar disorder; and
4. describe three domains in which people with bipolar disorder typically experience impairment.

Instructional Level: Basic
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Video

Anna Van Meter, Ph.D., studies environmental and biological influences on the development and trajectory of bipolar spectrum disorders. She is particularly interested in the roles the circadian rhythm, emotion processing, and physical health and activity play in the onset of bipolar spectrum disorders. Dr. Van Meter is also involved in the development and dissemination of low cost interventions to improve outcomes in young people at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Additionally, Dr. Van Meter is engaged in efforts to increase the evidence-based practice of psychology and to make psychological science more accessible to community clinicians, particularly through the dissemination of evidence-based assessment tools. Dr. Van Meter earned her Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is an Assistant Professor at Yeshiva University in New York City.

 

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS, 1:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Dilemmas of Working with High Conflict Families*
Helen T. Brantley, Ph.D., Private Practice

This workshop will address practical and ethical dilemmas of working with high conflict families as an adult therapist, a child therapist, a family therapist, a court-ordered therapist, an evaluator, and a parenting coordinator. It will focus on underlying causes of high conflict divorce, identifying dilemmas involved in working with high conflict families, detailing specific standards of practice useful with these families, and identifying appropriate training to ensure competent work with this difficult population. Ethical dimensions and standards in working with these challenging cases will be emphasized. While the presenter is a member of the North Carolina Psychology Board, this workshop expresses the views of the presenter and does not represent the opinion of the Psychology Board in any way.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. identify three common dilemmas faced when working with high conflict families regardless of the role the psychologist plays as well as two specific dilemmas for each of the different roles (adult therapist, child therapist, family therapist, court-ordered therapist, evaluator, parenting coordinator);
2. identify three specific standards of practice that are frequently problematic in working with members of high conflict families as well as approaches for addressing them; and
3. identify practical and ethical dimensions of problems faced when working with high conflict families.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Case Presentation

Helen T. Brantley, Ph.D. holds bachelors and doctoral degrees in Psychology from Duke University with a Post-doctoral Fellowship in Clinical Child Psychology from the University of North Carolina Hospitals Department of Psychiatry. She served on the faculties of both Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill. At UNC Hospitals, she directed/co-directed the Forensic Service for 15 years. She co-chaired the Task Force for Local Rules in Custody Disputes for 15B Court District and chaired the Task Force on Developing Guidelines for the Practice of Parenting Coordination for the American Psychological Association. She has published in the area of divorce and has presented nationally and internationally. She has been a member of NCPA for many years and served on the Psychology and Law Committee, and is currently a member of the North Carolina Psychology Board.

 

Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Assessment & Treatment
Anna Van Meter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University

This workshop will focus on how to apply knowledge of pediatric bipolar disorder to one’s clinical work. Specifically, we will review the phenomenology of each subtype of bipolar disorder, and how to best assess for this difficult-to-diagnose illness. Related, we will review psychosocial treatments for pediatric bipolar disorder, both those designed specifically for this population, and techniques clinicians may already be familiar with that can be helpful.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. differentiate between the subtypes of bipolar disorder in youth based on the severity, duration, and number of manic symptoms. Additionally, they will learn how to distinguish bipolar disorder from other childhood disorders, including disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, ADHD, and depression by determining the episodicity of symptoms, and by identifying mania-specific symptoms;
2. administer the top two screening tools for bipolar disorder in youth, and will be taught how to combine results from the screening tools with other clinically-relevant information to determine a diagnostic likelihood ratio using a nomogram;
3. explain the primary treatment targets are for many youth with bipolar disorder
4. recognize key elements of CBT family-focused therapy and two evidence-based treatments for pediatric bipolar disorder; and
5. identify elements from standard cognitive and behavioral techniques that address the primary treatment targets for youth with bipolar disorder and their families.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Video, Practice Applying Skills

Anna Van Meter, Ph.D., studies environmental and biological influences on the development and trajectory of bipolar spectrum disorders. She is particularly interested in the roles the circadian rhythm, emotion processing, and physical health and activity play in the onset of bipolar spectrum disorders. Dr. Van Meter is also involved in the development and dissemination of low cost interventions to improve outcomes in young people at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Additionally, Dr. Van Meter is engaged in efforts to increase the evidence-based practice of psychology and to make psychological science more accessible to community clinicians, particularly through the dissemination of evidence-based assessment tools. Dr. Van Meter earned her Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is an Assistant Professor at Yeshiva University in New York City.


Register Online!


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7
MORNING WORKSHOPS: 9:00 AM -12:15 PM

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Facilitating Meaningful Behavior Change
Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Duke University Medical Center

In this workshop, participants learn the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of the ACT model and how knowledge of these underpinnings can allow the therapist to be creative and flexible in the therapy room. Participants practice formulating psychological struggles in terms of the 6 core ACT processes and recognizing these struggles within themselves during challenging therapeutic moments. Through didactic presentation, discussion, and role-play, participants learn when to engage specific ACT processes to maximize therapeutic benefit. Participants are encouraged to have some basic familiarity with the ACT model to allow for more time devoted to application and advancing therapeutic skill.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. state the underlying principles of the ACT model, a skill that increases therapist adherence while allowing for flexibility of intervention in practice;
2. identify psychological struggles within the 6 core process domains in the client and in themselves (the therapist); and
3. discriminate when to engage different ACT processes to maximize therapeutic benefit.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Role Play

Rhonda Merwin, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and the Director of the ACT at Duke Program. Dr. Merwin completed her Ph.D. at the University of Mississippi under the mentorship of Dr. Kelly Wilson and a clinical internship and NIH-sponsored postdoctoral fellowship in Behavioral Medicine at Duke before joining the Duke faculty in 2008. Her research program focuses on the mechanisms and treatment of eating disorders and is funded by NIMH and NIDDK. Her current grant develops an ACT-based intervention for individuals with type 1 diabetes who omit insulin for weight loss and uses mobile technology to deliver intervention in the moment. Her forthcoming book (to be published by Guilford Press) provides clinical guidance on using ACT to treat anorexia nervosa across the lifespan. Dr. Merwin is a peer-reviewed ACT trainer. She regularly provides ACT workshops for professionals and is core teaching faculty at the Duke School of Medicine.

 

Mind Your Own Business: Managing the Business Side of Your Private Practice
Coordinators:
Sandra Wartski, Psy.D., Private Practice
Vanessa Roddenberry, Ph.D., Early Career Psychologist, Private Practice

Panel:
Patrick Rodriguez, MBA Candidate, Senior Area Manager, U.S. Small Business Administration
Lauren Maxie, JD, Managing Attorney, NC Planning
H. Lee Miller, CPA, CMA, MBA, Owner, H. Lee Miller, CPA

This workshop focuses on the business side of running a private practice. Knowledge about managing a business is just as vital to starting a new practice as clinical skill, marketing, getting on insurance panels, and establishing a web presence, yet it does not seem to receive the same attention in graduate school or subsequent training opportunities. This workshop is geared towards not only the early career psychologists who are newer to business but also to those more senior clinicians who might be transitioning from a salaried job shifting into private practice or who simply might wish to receive some updated information about business matters. We will have a 3-person panel including a business-planning attorney, a CPA and a Senior Area Manager of the Small Business Administration. Topics covered will be driven, in part, by participant questions but will include issues related to legal contracts, purchase agreements, leases, business employment agreements, financial planning, bookkeeping, accounting, taxes, types of business structures or partnerships, payroll issues, and a variety of resources available to the business owner. There will be sufficient time provided for question and answer period with each of the panelists.

Small Business Administration Perspective:
Patrick Rodriguez is the Senior Area Manager of the North Carolina District Office of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). He will present on SBA programs and services aimed at professionals who want to start or expand their practices and/or a small business. Patrick will share details about how The North Carolina SBA Offices along with its Resource Partners provide long-term one-on-one business mentoring provided by individuals with tangible real-world experience in: business start-ups, financing, expansion, funding (SBA Loans), and government contracting. SBA Resource Partners are the pillars of America’s largest network of business advisors made up of volunteer and paid subject matter experts from: SCORE, Small Business Technology Development Center Network, The Women’s Business Center Network, and the Veteran Business Outreach Center Network.

Legal Perspective:
Lauren Maxie is the managing attorney at NC Planning. One of the primary practice areas of NC Planning is assisting individual professionals with their business ownership. They function as the in-house counsel for the small business owner and enjoy ongoing relationships built on open communications with their clients. Common matters they assist business owners with range from legal formation of a practice entity, negotiation, and drafting of lease agreements, employment agreement, stock purchase and asset purchase agreements. They also assist clients with communications with professional boards regarding licensing and complaints. NC Planning engages with its professional clients to be a strategic ongoing partner for proactive planning. There will be issues that arise in practice. Ideally, we are able to anticipate and plan for them accordingly. When other issues arise, NC Planning is able to step in quickly for its ongoing planning clients because they are familiar with their clients’ needs and goals.

CPA Perspective:
H. Lee Miller, CPA, CMA has worked with small businesses and individuals starting up new business for almost 20 years. He will present on some of the challenges incurred with new practices, including payroll and tax issues, bookkeeping, and billing/collection. He will also cover the different types of corporate structures and their tax implications.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. describe different potential business structures (e.g., partnership, sole proprietor, S Corp LLC, LLP) and the different advantages each may offer a business proprietor(s) as well as some of the resources and mentoring available for small business owners;
2. explain several of the legal procedures required to create and maintain a private practice, how to protect limited liability, as well as list some of the potential areas of legal concern for small business owners; and
3. discuss some of the specific tax filing and formation requirements and processes as they relate to different business structures as well as some of the common financial pitfalls of business ownership.

Instructional Level: Basic
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Slides

Patrick Rodriguez is the Senior Area Manager of the North Carolina District Office of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). Patrick assists business owners, lenders, and government contracting entities access SBA programs and services throughout 21 northeast counties. Previously, Patrick worked as an Economic Development Specialist and Public Information Officer for the Los Angeles SBA District Office. As an Army veteran, Patrick led the office’s veteran outreach including Boots2Business training. Before joining the SBA, he worked for Congresswoman Linda Sanchez for five years as her Senior Congressional Aide in her California District Office and was responsible for business, transportation, and veteran issues.

Lauren Maxie, JD developed an interest in legal planning early in her career and has become a key advisor to NC Planning’s clients. Whether it is drafting employment contracts, walking a client through the sale of their business, or drafting an estate plan, Lauren’s passion for providing her clients with the highest level of service and expertise is what makes her such an excellent attorney. While Lauren is very well versed in the law and most likely recites it in her sleep, she is also upbeat, and her motivation to do the best job continually shines through in everything she does. Lauren truly cares about her clients, and she strives to create long-lasting relationships with each of them. She has a desire to educate and make the community aware of the importance of legal planning. Lauren has been described as one of the few people that can talk about legal matters without putting her audience to sleep.

H. Lee Miller is a CMA and CPA and possesses an MBA from Meredith College, where he was one of the first male graduates. He obtained his B.S. in accounting at North Carolina State University. He has owned his own private firm, H. Lee Miller, CPA, for almost 20 years and has extensive experience in helping small to mid-sized service oriented businesses establish or improve their financial accounting operations, whether outsourced or performed in house. His range of clients, both in size and type, allows him to provide helpful tips to reduce fees, save time and stress. He has also represented numerous clients in front of the IRS regarding employment and income tax audits and knows how to protect both your business and yourself.

 

AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS, 1:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Using Act to Treat Anorexia Nervosa (AN) or AN-Spectrum Behavior
Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Duke University Medical Center

In this workshop, participants are oriented to an ACT-consistent approach to formulating and treating anorexia nervosa (AN) and AN-spectrum behavior. A model of AN as difficulty with adaptive self-regulation is presented and participants learn how this formulation informs treatment decisions. Unique challenges in working with AN clients are identified and strategies to overcome these challenges are discussed. This includes the difficulties that arise for therapists when working with clients with symptoms that are ego-syntonic and life-threatening. How to use ACT processes to remain flexible and effective in session is discussed.

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. formulate anorexia nervosa (AN) from an ACT perspective;
2. state at least 3 challenges in treating individuals with AN and how to overcome these challenges in a model-consistent manner; and
3. identify how to use ACT to maximize therapist flexibility when working with AN clients.

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Lecture, Discussion, Role Play

Rhonda Merwin, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at Duke University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and the Director of the ACT at Duke Program. Dr. Merwin completed her PhD at the University of Mississippi under the mentorship of Dr. Kelly Wilson and a clinical internship and NIH-sponsored postdoctoral fellowship in Behavioral Medicine at Duke before joining the Duke faculty in 2008. Her research program focuses on the mechanisms and treatment of eating disorders and is funded by NIMH and NIDDK. Her current grant develops an ACT-based intervention for individuals with type 1 diabetes who omit insulin for weight loss and uses mobile technology to deliver intervention in the moment. Her forthcoming book (to be published by Guilford Press) provides clinical guidance on using ACT to treat anorexia nervosa across the lifespan. Dr. Merwin is a peer-reviewed ACT trainer. She regularly provides ACT workshops for professionals and is core teaching faculty at the Duke School of Medicine.

 

A Conversation About Tricky Ethical and Legal Issues Encountered in Clinical Practice*
Catherine A. Forneris, Ph.D., JD, Professor, UNC School of Medicine
Charles G. Guyer, II, Ed.D., ABPP, Head of Psychology, Naval Hospital, Camp Lejeune
Katherine A. Prakken, Ph.D., Private Practice
Elliot M. Silverstein, JD, Ph.D., ABPP, Professor, UNC School of Medicine

This workshop will focus on tricky issues we encounter in the actual practice of psychology that may pose legal and ethical challenges or questions, which we may have addressed in the more sanitized world of academia. Should you attend your client’s wedding if invited? Should you “friend” your client, trainee, or supervisee on Facebook? Should you say anything to a trainee or colleague who wears flip-flops when seeing clients? Suppose you do not like your client or you are not a good fit – and other issues along these lines.

In this interactive workshop, panelists will provide vignettes based on situations they have actually encountered and navigated during the course of their careers. Participants will be asked to work through these vignettes and identify the potential ethical and legal issues. As the discussion unfolds, the panelists will talk about what the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA Code) states or does not state about the particular issue(s) involved in each case, any legal considerations that might impact the issues in North Carolina, and how the panelist ultimately addressed the issue(s).

By the end of this Workshop, participants will be able to:
1. identify the various ethical and possibly legal issues within each vignette and state the potential benefits and risks associated with each one;
2. identify and apply the specific section(s) of the APA that may have bearing on this issue(s), and be able to articulate how and why it applies to the issue(s); and
3. when relevant, know what aspects of North Carolina law have bearing on the identified issue(s).

Instructional Level: Intermediate
Educational Format: Vignettes, Interactive Small Group Work, Panel Presentation, & Large Audience Discussion

Catherine A. Forneris, Ph.D., JD, is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. She is a graduate of the University at Albany, State University of New York. She is currently a Board member of the North Carolina Psychological Association, and is chair of the Continuing Education Committee, and a member of the Legislative Committee. She has co-authored several research articles and been the lead author on several paper presentations on trauma, PTSD, health care utilization, and women’s health. The primary focus of her current clinical work is as the director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy program at UNC-Chapel Hill. She is also a medical co-director of the UNC Hospitals Beacon Child and Family program, which provides a variety of services to employees and patients of all ages, and their families who are victims of interpersonal violence. Dr. Forneris has been a co-investigator on several research projects funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, many of which focus on mood disorders. She recently served as a co-investigator on systematic reviews for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality on effective treatments for PTSD and Major Depression, as well as effective interventions to prevent PTSD. She earned her law degree in 2016 and has a small private practice in Durham.

Charles G. Guyer, II, Ed.D., ABPP received his doctoral degree in Counseling Psychology from The College of William and Mary in Virginia (1978). He holds an ABPP in Counseling Psychology and an ABPP in Couple and Family Psychology. He is currently a Clinical Psychologist and the Subject Matter Expert in Military Psychology at the Naval Hospital –Camp Lejeune (Department of Defense) where he serves as a member of the Credentials Review Committee and Research Quality Council. Dr. Guyer is a past-president of the American Board of Couple and Family Psychology (ABPP), and a past board member of the American Board of Counseling Psychology (ABPP). He is the founding president of the American Academy of Counseling Psychology and a past- president of the American Academy of Couple and Family Psychology. He is past chair of the ethics committee of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. Dr. Guyer is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (numerous divisions) and the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis.

Katherine A. Prakken, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Chapel Hill, NC. Dr. Prakken received her BA from Duke University, and her MA and Ph.D. from the California School of Professional Psychology, Berkeley. Early in her career, Dr. Prakken was a child psychologist specializing in childhood sexual abuse. She is the former director of training of Contra Costa County Child & Family Mental Health Services in Concord, CA. Dr. Prakken began private practice work in 1990.She currently works with individuals, couples, and college students. She treats anxiety, depression, and women’s issues and has a specialization in eating disorders and couples therapy. She also works with adult ADHD, couples, and families impacted by ADHD, and 2E students. Dr. Prakken does psychodynamic relational therapy and incorporates CBT and mindfulness techniques. She enjoys doing supervision and consultation. She is a member of NCPA, APA, APA Division 39, the Academy of Eating Disorders, and the International Academy of Eating Disorder Professionals.

Elliot Silverstein, J.D., Ph.D., ABPP is a clinical professor and Director of Psychological Services at Child Outpatient Program of the UNC Department of Psychiatry. In addition, he is also an adjunct professor at the UNC School of Law. Since 2000, Dr. Silverstein has been a Co-Chair for the Professional Affairs and Ethics Committee of the North Carolina Psychological Association (NCPA) and serves on NCPA’s Board of Directors. As part of his duties, he routinely assists psychologists who are dealing with difficult clinical, legal, and ethical dilemmas. He has designed and given numerous workshops and presentations on Ethics and Risk Management, including a biennial ethics workshop at Duke University Medical Center. In addition, since 1986 Elliot has maintained an active part-time psychotherapy practice and has extensive experience working with professionals and executives.


Register Online!


INFORMATION
Conference Registration Fee, Deadlines, and Refund Policy: The registration fee includes the workshops selected, refreshment breaks, and lunch each day. The deadline for registration is Thursday, September 28, 2017 at 12:00 pm NOON. A $50 late fee is added for registrations received after 12 Noon on September 28, 2017.

All refunds are minus a $50 administrative fee. You will receive a full refund for cancellation before Friday, September 22, 2017; a one-half refund by noon Thursday, September, 28, 2017; and no refund after Noon, September 28, 2017.

Continuing Education Credit: The North Carolina Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The North Carolina Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content. Each session is offered for 3 hours of continuing education credit.

The courses offered for credit are intended to meet Category A criteria under the rules of the NC Psychology Board.

Attendance Requirements: To receive credit, you must be present for the entire workshop, and you must sign the sign-in and sign-out sheets. No credit will be given to participants who are more than 15 minutes late at the beginning of the morning and afternoon session. No credit will be given to participants who leave before the close of the workshop.

Ethics & Legal: If a workshop is intended to meet the NC Psychology Requirements, it will be noted under its’ title.

Facility Information: The Friday Center is located just off I-40 in Chapel Hill. Use the Highway #54 exit (273 A or B). Directions will be mailed to you with your conference confirmation. Directions are also posted on : www.ncpsychology.org and : http://fridaycenter.unc.edu/map-and-directions/.

Hotel Information: NCPA has reserved a block of rooms at the Courtyard by Marriot next to the Friday Center. Assorted rooms (King, Queen, etc.) are available at $139.00 per night. To reserve a room, call the hotel locally at 919.883.0700 or 1.800.321.2211 & ask for the Fall CE Institute September 2017 Block. You may register online using this link: : www.marriott.com/RDUCH. A limited number of rooms are reserved so please register early. After Tuesday, September 5, rooms will be provided on a space-available basis at prevailing rates. Additional hotels are posted on : www.ncpsychology.org.

Special Needs: If you have special dietary needs (vegetarian, a medical issue, etc.) or physical requirements please make note of this on the registration form. This must be received at least two (2) weeks in advance (by September 22, 2017).

Student Sponsor: Please consider sponsoring a graduate student or psychology intern to attend the conference (limit = 10 slots per offering). See the information on p.7.

Early Career Psychologists and Experienced Psychologists: Tables will be reserved during lunch for you to sit together and share information and ask questions. Information is on p.7.

Exhibitors: NCPF/NCPA is fortunate to have a number of exhibitors who support the conference. Please help us show our appreciation by visiting the exhibit area during breaks and meal hours. Thank You!

No Smoking: All institutes are non-smoking.

Continuing Education Committee: Catherine Forneris, Ph.D., Chair; Suzanne Bates, Ph.D., Michael Bigsby, Ph.D., Jerry Brittain, Ph.D., Emily Brown Cabezudo, Ph.D., Andrew Goff, Ph.D., Susan Hurt, Ph.D., Amy Mistler, Ph.D., Abra Nardo, Ph.D., Cristin Saffo, Psy.D., Janet Savia, Psy.D., Richard Sparacio, Ph.D., Sally Cameron and Carol Kulwicki.

For Additional Information Contact:
NC Psychological Foundation, 1004 Dresser Court, Suite 106, Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone: 919.872.1005 Fax: 919.872.0805
Email: [email protected]

Find a Psychologist

Search by Name
or




MORE SEARCH OPTIONS
  • CLICK HERE TO JOIN NCPA